Skip to content

Writing for Education

6. “The Grove” Community Health Narratives (E. Mendenhall and K. Wollner, Editors), University of New Mexico Press, Spring 2015
“Stop right there, Kimberly. Don’t make me come over and stop you myself.”

5. “Route 100” Community Health Narratives (E. Mendenhall and K. Wollner, Editors), University of New Mexico Press, Spring 2015
Shannon stares at her father, searching his face for a sign that he’s joking.

4. “Creativity Matters: The 7/6 Project and the Edges that Expand Writing” (co-authored with Dr. Katie Cunningham) the English Record, Winter 2013
Our lives are narratives in the making. The seven brief memoirs above, only six words each, capture within their narrow borders our life stories, the discrete parts of ourselves that constitute our identities.

3. “In the Clear” Environmental Health Narratives (E. Mendenhall and A. Koon, Editors), University of New Mexico Press, July 2012
Stuffed walrus, seashell necklace, princess doll, eleven books, purple sheets, clothes, shoes, diary. Poppy looked at the pile containing all her belongings and sighed.

2. “The Indian in the Classroom” In The Fray, March 2009
In the fall of 2002, I was teaching third grade at an independent, coeducational elementary and middle school in Manhattan. As October rolled by, I asked a student what he was going to be for Halloween. “I’m going as an Indian,” he said, excitedly. He seemed to be looking forward to the upcoming candy fest. But to me, his response was a flag — a big red flag with “teachable moment” written all over it.

1. “Straight from the Horses’ Mouths” (co-authored with Dr. Katie Cunningham) ATIS Annual Publication, 2004
In recent studies of education by the American media, boys have been singled out, particularly for their poor performance in reading and writing when compared to girls, and for their overall disinterest in school.

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: